War & Religion http://ift.tt/1cfQlfx



Sex and beer. See the connection?

Uhh… Quite honestly, no. Just a cheap advertisement/propaganda trick — link completely unrelated things to create desired positive or negative association.

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7 thoughts on “War & Religion http://ift.tt/1cfQlfx

    • Go back to my post regarding my experience with Soviet propaganda. My only point here is that showing emotionally charged images, preferably containing sex and violence, does not count as a rational argument in my book. When I see people using this technique, my BS sensor reads high.

      Does the name Pavlov ring a bell? If I give you food and ring a bell, you will soon begin to salivate when a bell rings without food. It does not mean that the food and the bell are connected in any way except through the will of the person who is interested in creating the reflex.

      Religion is connected to, pretty much, any aspect of human life. So, yes, perhaps, there is a connection between war and religion. But this poster does a terrible job showing or exploring it.

      • Having, as I do, a number of psych courses behind me, yes, I’m quite familiar with Pavlov and his conditioned responses, and we’re not in total disagreement, but I must say that in the past 2000 years, more people have been killed in the name of “god“, than for any other reason, from the crusades to WW II, and all the way to Iraq.

        In this country, sadly, during the Korean War, I have actually seen bumper stickers that read, “Kill a Commie For Christ,” as if that legendary, “turn-the-other-cheek” guy would have us out there killing people whose ideological economic systems differ from our own.

        • but I must say that in the past 2000 years, more people have been killed in the name of “*god*”, than for any other reason, from the crusades to WW II, and all the way to Iraq.

          In this country, sadly, during the Korean War, I have actually seen bumper stickers that read, “Kill a Commie For Christ,” as if that legendary, ” *turn-the-other-cheek*” guy would have us out there killing people whose ideological economic systems differ from our own.

          I think, “God” for many people stands for a “higher cause” which transcends our individual causes. I know, for example, that in Russia and Ukraine, religion is a symbol of national identity. Even in the Bible, God of Abraham and the covenant with Israel was critical for defining the nation of Israel.

          Without religion, the same social and psychological mechanisms would still be at play, but they, perhaps, would be called differently (take the idea of communism in Russia, for example). I don’t think that if we get rid of religion, wars (or even most of them) would go away. I think, people use religion to justify wars rather than going to wars because of their religion.

          Just because people say that they go to war because of their religion, it is not necessarily so. Bush said that U.S. invaded Iraq to “liberate” Iraqi people from tyranny, bring democracy to Iraq, destroy WMD, etc. But it seems to me that economic interests of U.S. corporations in controlling the region central to oil production were also significant (if not the main) reasons for the war in Iraq.

          On Tue, Feb 4, 2014 at 12:25 AM, Unapologetics comment-reply@wordpress.comwrote:

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          • “I think, people use religion to justify wars rather than going to wars because of their religion.”

            I suspect it’s a little of each. I agree about the US economic interests, via Dick “Halliburton” Cheney, but don’t forget that Little George W. once said, “I trust God speaks through me!”

          • but don’t forget that Little George W. once said, “I trust God speaks through me!”

            You need to get use to the lingo used by religious people. There is, usually, a non-religious equivalent to what it means. When people say “I trust God speaks through me”, they usually mean “I believe, I’m right”. I don’t see anything wrong with this because everyone believes he’s right. The question is the level of certainty. And an atheist who is certain that he is right is as arrogant and dangerous as a religious fundamentalist who believes that his will is the will of God in this respect. “God knows” usually means “nobody knows”. “God forbid” means “I don’t want this to happen”, “God moves me to do this” means that “I feel it will be best to do this”. Etc.

            On Fri, Feb 7, 2014 at 6:57 PM, Unapologetics comment-reply@wordpress.comwrote:

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